A Dusted Review: The Last Train by Roger Turner and Otomo Yoshihide (February 19th, 2015)

In improvisation, silence matters almost as much as the actual playing, something that is immediately apparent on The Last Train, a welcome pairing between Roger Turner, one of the UK’s most vaunted drummers, and Japan’s Otomo Yoshihide, a multi-instrumentalist of wide-reaching tastes and skill, here flexing his considerable musical muscles on electric guitar. I’ve lost count of the number of “free” bands/duos I’ve seen over the years who appear ignorant of that important fact, preferring to square up to or blare over one another in an apparent attempt to assert dominance or prove his or her musical credentials. Seriously, folks, rein it in: if you do, you might actually hear your fellow musicians, surely the fundamental ingredient for group improvisation.

Well, Turner and Yoshihide are old hands, veterans even, and this is not their first foray into free improv by a long shot. The resulting moments on The Last Train where the music of either or both players recedes are fascinating, even captivating, glimpses of two musicians sounding each other out and intuitively plotting where they’ll go next. The album was recorded live, so from the get-go this implied potential fills the ether, as “The Wait” emerges from the speakers with the hum of an amp and the barely-perceptible sound of both men shifting as they take up their positions. At first, their progress is slow, with Turner’s muted, but rapid, patters on cymbals and the edges of his drums flittering around extended single notes from Yoshihide. Every time they build up some momentum, they immediately pull back, creating a tension that only occasionally breaks as Turner cranks up the barrage on what sounds like an infinite number of percussive devices (having seen him live, his set-up is a veritable treasure trove of bells, chains, bowls and blocks), with Yoshihide a relatively mellow sounding board.

The reason for such a tentative approach only gradually reveals itself. By dwelling on lengthy single notes, Yoshihide allows his guitar’s feedback to build up, and as The Last Train unfurls with ghostly patience, he carefully molds the increasingly molten sounds emerging from his six-string until at times it barely sounds like a guitar at all. This all bursts into life on “The Sign,” with Turner dancing around Yoshihide’s squalling half-solos like a dervish, but they almost immediately sit back again for the first half of “Crack’s” expertly crafted 11 minutes. Here, Turner’s jangles on bells and bowls imbues the music with a gamelan-like ritualism, whilst Yoshihide’s guitar acts as a bass-heavy foundation allowing the drummer to throw out percussive blasts and clashes in controlled abandon. “Crack” ultimately culminates with an exhilarating bout of sturm und drang, with Yoshihide coming on like Keiji Haino and Turner channelling the spirit of Tony Williams via Keith Moon, but the will-they-or-won’t-they? build-up is just as thrilling.

Fataka is rapidly becoming a truly essential record label. With The Last Train they’ve added another exciting string to their improvisational bow. Otomo Yoshihide and Roger Turner may have both contributed to more “important” records than this brief session, but here they are in their element, two master musicians exhibiting every skill and talent that makes improv such an exciting and unpredictable genre. And they do so with remarkable—and essential—patience.

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